Dana is a young artist native to the San Francisco bay area, but currently studying Photography with a concentration in Sustainability & Social Practice in Baltimore.

www.danamchang.com
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allielinn:

also stop by fox 2 gallery on friday from 6-8 for the opening of HINK PINK: the annual sustainability & social practice exhibition! catered by *Canteen* 
I’m just gonna name some foods Canteen serves to let you know what’s up.
Laksa - Malaysian curry noodle soup w/ chicken and oyster mushrooms (“It’s extraordinary”—-Roche Bill)
Roasted roots - root veggies, poached eggs, salad 
Lions Head - Chinese style pork meatballs w/ ginger tamari sauce over rice
I have also had a killer ginger carrot soup here. who knows what tricks they have up their sleeves for the show though……?
live music by Flashlight O and mayB others!
come out, come out, gonna be a goooooooooood time

This is happening! Everybody come out and have fun with us!

allielinn:

also stop by fox 2 gallery on friday from 6-8 for the opening of HINK PINK: the annual sustainability & social practice exhibition! catered by *Canteen

I’m just gonna name some foods Canteen serves to let you know what’s up.

Laksa - Malaysian curry noodle soup w/ chicken and oyster mushrooms (“It’s extraordinary”—-Roche Bill)

Roasted roots - root veggies, poached eggs, salad 

Lions Head - Chinese style pork meatballs w/ ginger tamari sauce over rice

I have also had a killer ginger carrot soup here. who knows what tricks they have up their sleeves for the show though……?

live music by Flashlight O and mayB others!

come out, come out, gonna be a goooooooooood time

This is happening! Everybody come out and have fun with us!

Eames House

Eames House

(2014)

(2014)

(Source: danamchang.com)

Frankfurt Kitchen (1929) by Grete Schütte-Lihotzky

Frankfurt Kitchen (1929) by Grete Schütte-Lihotzky

Marmalade citrus peel pattern! 

Marmalade citrus peel pattern! 

Everybody try Artifact’s Bowl and a Beer on Wednesdays from 6-9pm!

Everybody try Artifact’s Bowl and a Beer on Wednesdays from 6-9pm!

americanphoto:

"Matthew Sullivan holds a Pacific sleeper shark we caught while long-lining for halibut aboard the F/V Two Bears. “
Continue reading about Corey Arnold’s life as a commercial fisherman and photographer HERE.
© Corey Arnold

Corey Arnold is the man

americanphoto:

"Matthew Sullivan holds a Pacific sleeper shark we caught while long-lining for halibut aboard the F/V Two Bears. “

Continue reading about Corey Arnold’s life as a commercial fisherman and photographer HERE.

© Corey Arnold

Corey Arnold is the man

(via polerstuff)

Baltimore Office of Sustainability 2012 Annual Report →

Here’s some good digestible information about what Baltimore is doing to accomplish a more sustainable city!

The problem with little white girls (and boys) by Pippa Biddle

Great read… been thinking a lot about what it really means to “help” a community. Often times it seems more selfishly driven than realized…. Thanks to Mira for sharing. 

White people aren’t told that the colour of their skin is a problem very often. We sail through police check points, don’t draw sideways glances in affluent neighbourhoods, and are generally understood to be predisposed for success based on a physical characteristic (the colour of our skin) we have little control over beyond sunscreen and tanning oil.

After six years of working in and travelling through a number of different countries where white people are in the numerical minority, I’ve come to realise that there is one place being white is not only a hindrance, but negative  –  most of the developing world.

In high school, I travelled to Tanzania as part of a school trip. There were 14 white girls, 1 black girl who, to her frustration, was called white by almost everyone we met in Tanzania, and a few teachers who chaperoned. $3,000 bought us a week at an orphanage, a half built library, and a few pickup football games, followed by a week-long safari.

Our mission while at the orphanage was to build a library. Turns out that we, a group of highly educated private boarding school students were so bad at the most basic construction work that each night the men had to take down the structurally unsound bricks we had laid and rebuild the structure so that, when we woke up in the morning, we would be unaware of our failure. It is likely that this was a daily ritual. Us mixing cement and laying bricks for 6+ hours, them undoing our work after the sun set, re-laying the bricks, and then acting as if nothing had happened so that the cycle could continue.

Basically, we failed at the sole purpose of our being there. It would have been more cost effective, stimulative of the local economy, and efficient for the orphanage to take our money and hire locals to do the work, but there we were trying to build straight walls without a level.

That same summer, I started working in the Dominican Republic (DR) at a summer camp I helped organise for HIV+ children. Within days, it was obvious that my rudimentary Spanish set me so far apart from the local Dominican staff that I might as well have been an alien. Try caring for children who have a serious medical condition, and are not inclined to listen, in a language that you barely speak. It isn’t easy. Now, 6 years later, I am much better at Spanish and am still highly involved with the camp programming, fundraising, and leadership. However, I have stopped attending having finally accepted that my presence is not the godsend I was coached by non-profits, documentaries, and service programs to believe it would be.

You see, the work we were doing in both the DR and Tanzania was good. The orphanage needed a library so that they could be accredited to a higher level as a school, and the camp in the DR needed funding and supplies so that it could provide HIV+ children with programs integral to their mental and physical health. It wasn’t the work that was bad. It was me being there.

It turns out that I, a little white girl, am good at a lot of things. I am good at raising money, training volunteers, collecting items, coordinating programs, and telling stories. I am flexible, creative, and able to think on my feet. On paper I am, by most people’s standards, highly qualified to do international aid. But I shouldn’t be.

I am not a teacher, a doctor, a carpenter, a scientist, an engineer, or any other professional that could provide concrete support and long-term solutions to communities in developing countries. I am a 5′ 4″ white girl who can carry bags of moderately heavy stuff, joke around with kids, attempt to teach a class, tell the story of how I found myself (with accompanying powerpoint) to a few thousand people and not much else.

Some might say that that’s enough. That as long as I go to ‘X’ country with an open mind and a good heart I’ll leave at least one child so uplifted and emboldened by my short stay that they will, for years, think of me every morning.

I don’t want a little girl in Ghana, or Sri Lanka, or Indonesia to think of me when she wakes up each morning. I don’t want her to thank me for her education or medical care or new clothes. Even if I am providing the funds to get the ball rolling, I want her to think about her teacher, community leader, or mother. I want her to have a hero who she can relate to — who looks like her, is part of her culture, speaks her language, and who she might bump into on the way to school one morning.

After my first trip to the Dominican Republic, I pledged to myself that we would, one day, have a camp run and executed by Dominicans. Now, about seven years later, the camp director, programme leaders and all but a handful of counsellors are Dominican. Each year we bring in a few Peace Corps Volunteers and highly-skilled volunteers from the USA who add value to our program, but they are not the ones in charge. I think we’re finally doing aid right, and I’m not there.

Before you sign up for a volunteer trip anywhere in the world this summer, consider whether you possess the skill set necessary for that trip to be successful. If yes, awesome. If not, it might be a good idea to reconsider your trip. Sadly, taking part in international aid where you aren’t particularly helpful is not benign. It’s detrimental. It slows down positive growth and perpetuates the “white saviour” complex that, for hundreds of years, has haunted both the countries we are trying to ‘save’ and our (more recently) own psyches. Be smart about travelling and strive to be informed and culturally aware. It’s only through an understanding of the problems communities are facing, and the continued development of skills within that community, that long-term solutions will be created.

Source: The One